Reward Strategy. Incoporating Payroll World.
Hello there,

You are viewing this article as a guest, please login or register to read more. 

New law could be introduced to prevent sexual harassment

A package of 12 announcements has been launched by the government to tackle sexual harassment at work.

TwitterLinkedInFacebook
The government will ensure the public sector takes action to tackle and prevent sexual harassment
The government will ensure the public sector takes action to tackle and prevent sexual harassment

As part of the new code of practice, the government will consult on the evidence base for introducing a new legal duty on employers to prevent sexual harassment in the workplace.

 

Responding to the Women and Equalities Select Committee report, the Government Equalities Office has promised to carry out awareness raising work with the Advisory, Conciliation and Arbitration Service, the Equality and Human Rights Commission and employers, on how to prevent and address sexual harassment at work.

 

The government will also consult on:

•Non-disclosure agreements;

•How to strengthen and clarify the laws in relation to third party harassment;

•Ensure the public sector takes action to tackle and prevent sexual harassment;

•Work with regulators for whom sexual harassment is particularly relevant to ensure they are taking appropriate action;

•Consider whether further learnings can be taken from the criminal justice system to use in the employment tribunal system, to ensure vulnerable claimants have appropriate protection.

 

Minister for women Victoria Atkins said: “Sexual harassment at work is illegal, but sadly that disgusting behaviour is something that many women still experience today.

 

“We are taking action to make sure employers know what they have to do to protect their staff, and people know their rights at work and what action to take if they feel intimidated or humiliated. Everyone has the right to feel safe at work.”

 

Business minister Kelly Tolhurst said that part of the discrimination and harassment women face at work is, in the minority of cases, where non-disclosure agreements are used unethically, and employees may not be aware of their protections and rights.

 

Going beyond the recommendations in the Women and Equalities Select Committee report, the government has promised to consult on whether additional protections are needed for volunteers and interns - looking at all the protections in the Equality Act 2010, not just those on sexual harassment.

 

It will also look to explore the evidence for extending the time limits to bring any workplace discrimination and harassment case under the Equality Act 2010 to an employment tribunal.

TwitterLinkedInFacebook
Add New Comment
LoginRegister

You might also like

Publish, with a plan, or be damned 

Publish, with a plan, or be damned 


Could you carry out the full pay journey on your daily commute?

Could you carry out the full pay journey on your daily commute?


More than 100,000 agency workers could benefit from “trailblazing reforms”

More than 100,000 agency workers could benefit from “trailblazing reforms”


The Reward 300 has evolved

The Reward 300 has evolved

LATEST PAYROLL AND REWARDS NEWS IN YOUR INBOX

Reward Strategy homepage
Reward Strategy RSS

Did you find our website useful?

Thank you for your input

Thank you for your feedback

reward-strategy.com - an online news and information service for the UK’s payroll, reward, pensions, benefits and HR sectors. reward-strategy.com is published by Shard Financial Media Limited, registered in England & Wales as 5481132, Axe & Bottle Court, 70 Newcomen St, London, SE1 1YT. All rights reserved. Reward Strategy is committed to diversity in the workplace.
© Copyright Shard Financial Media Ltd